Libya

JHI on the Issues 2016: Intervention in Libya

JHI on the Issues 2016:  Intervention in Libya

Libya today is not much more stable than Syria because of poor planning and execution following the removal of Muammar Gaddafi. From the outset, the Obama administration repeatedly stressed the limits of American involvement in Libya, “leading from behind.”  Intervention would establish a no-fly zone, deliver humanitarian aid, and let the Libyans sort out the rest, but would be coupled with calls for Gaddafi to step down.  The failure to stabilize Libya following Gaddafi’s removal created an environment where revolutionary militias that had yet to demobilize, disarm, and reintegrate into Libyan society turned against one other, which drove civil war and provided an opening for ISIS to establish a significant foothold in the country.  Because Libya has become a failed state, terrorists will continue to establish safe havens, control Libya’s vast potential wealth, and contribute to regional insecurity.

Egypt's Fight Against Terrorism and the Implications for U.S. Counter-Terrorism Policy

Egypt's Fight Against Terrorism and the Implications for U.S. Counter-Terrorism Policy

For Egypt's fight against growing terrorist group Sinai Province to be successful, it is imperative that President el-Sisi distinguish between a real terror threat and political opposition.